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What factors contributed to the plight of rural farmers?

The Great Depression

Question Answer
Which of these factors contributed to the plight of rural farmers? Falling prices for crops and livestock
Farmers contributed to the problems that led to the Dust Bowl by? using intensive farming practices hat removed protective grasses

What factors contributed to the plight of farmers in the late nineteenth century?

At the end of the 19th century, about a third of Americans worked in agriculture, compared to only about four percent today. After the Civil War, drought, plagues of grasshoppers, boll weevils, rising costs, falling prices, and high interest rates made it increasingly difficult to make a living as a farmer.

Which factor contributed to the spread of the Great Depression?

The factor that contributed to the spread of the Great Depression in overseas was the reduction of United States investment in European nations.

Which factor helped hide economic problems in the 1920s?

One of the factors that helped hide economic problems in the 1920’s was that Americans purchased many consumer goods on credit. Farmers contributed to the problems that led to the dust bowl by using intensive farming practices that removed protective grasses.

Which of these was a factor that led to the Dust Bowl?

The Dust Bowl was caused by several economic and agricultural factors, including federal land policies, changes in regional weather, farm economics and other cultural factors. After the Civil War, a series of federal land acts coaxed pioneers westward by incentivizing farming in the Great Plains.

How did farmers contributed to the problems that led to the Dust Bowl?

Over-Plowing Contributes to the Dust Bowl or the 1930s. Each year, the process of farming begins with preparing the soil to be seeded. But for years, farmers had plowed the soil too fine, and they contributed to the creation of the Dust Bowl. Each design lifted the soil up, broke it up and turned it over.

What caused the Great Dust Bowl of 1930?

The Dust Bowl was a period of severe dust storms that greatly damaged the ecology and agriculture of the American and Canadian prairies during the 1930s; severe drought and a failure to apply dryland farming methods to prevent the aeolian processes (wind erosion) caused the phenomenon.

What event worsened the plight of farmers in the 1930s?

The event worsened the plight of farmers in the 1930s was called the Dust Bowl.

How did people survive the Dust Bowl?

Dust blocked exterior doors; to get outside, people had to climb out their windows and shovel the dust away. The Dust Bowl was result of the worst drought in U.S. history. A meager existence Families survived on cornbread, beans, and milk.

How did the Dust Bowl affect the environment?

The Dust Bowl of the 1930s was one of the worst environmental crises to strike twentieth century North America. Severe drought and wind erosion ravaged the Great Plains for a decade. The dust and sand storms degraded soil productivity, harmed human health, and damaged air quality.

What factors contributed to farmers difficulties in the 1920s and 1930s?

The factors that contributed to farmer’s difficulties in the 1920s to 1930s were the severe drought and the strong winds that destroyed their crops so they were unable to pay their debts.